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Policy makers and practitioners take an international TVET course in Jerusalem

February 06, 2017
The Aharon Ofri MASHAV International Educational Training Center (METC) hosted a group of academics, policy makers and practitioners, providing them with an opportunity to learn about policies in TVET and ways of adapting them in teaching planning to the socio-economic realities of their home countries, as well as about the promotion of initiatives and specialized programs in the schools in Israel. The group of nineteen TVET professionals have had a number of seminars and discussions on various aspects of TVET, as well as have enjoyed professional visits to schools that represent different areas and curriculum models.

“The course is valuable because every participant learns from experience of others. And while learning, we leave and study here like a family, and that is the way I actually call the participants”, said the hosting 
METC Director Yudith Rosenthal.

Paul Ssendagire, an artist and art teacher from Kampala, Uganda has found the course thought-provoking and different from the events he has previously attended. “I am learning about models of TVET that are in place in Israel and other countries, as my course-mates come from different continents. My joining the course was prompted by the wish to experience an exposure to an absolutely unique experience of learning with other educators, as well as to share the experience of Uganda”, he reflected.

“I am learning about models of TVET that are in place in Israel and other countries, as my course-mates come from different continents. My joining the course was prompted by the wish to experience an exposure to an absolutely unique experience of learning with other educators, as well as to share the experience of Uganda”

  
Together with his course-mates during the three-week programme, Paul has been practicing ways to encourage a wide dialogue and analysis of policy-making processes and teacher training programs in the TVET field, analyzing the place and role of TVET within national development, and mastering new concepts, methods, and tools regarding different skills towards TVET. 
   
The participants also visited a variety of companies that promote entrepreneurship in TVET  and cultural sites such as the Yad Vashem: World Holocaust Center in Jerusalem and outside the capital.
   
According to Oleksandra Borodiyenko, a deputy director of a TVET R&D institution in Kyiv, Ukraine, the most impressive were people of Israel, their way of thinking and facing challenges, and their passion for innovation. Tamar Kitiashvili, a UNDP project officer from Tbilisi, Georgia has been inspired by community cooperation in Israel, which is focused on the joint result. “Competition in Israeli TVET looks like cooperation, hence they call it coopetition”, she concluded.
  
 Moses Hanry, a TVET practitioner from Nairobi, Kenya has brought to the course the idea of the importance of the links between TVET and the industry, zest for competency-based curriculum and holistic education.   “The primary TVET objective is to provide the training that would best equip the students for their profession in the industry”, he observed.
   
The course participants has got acquainted with various educational projects and curriculum models used in Israel, they have not only been sharing the knowledge gained in their countries of origin,  but had their hand in exploring the ways to adapt the teaching environment to new technologies. And, most importantly, they have tasted the philosophy of the MASHAV through finding out how rewarding sharing can actually be in TVET.

By Perpetual Boadi, Raymond Jumaye and Oksana Kozak.